Officials: Army Vet Targeting White Supremacists Wanted Revenge For NZ Attacks

CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND - MARCH 23: Al Noor mosque is pictured after being officially reopened following last weeks attack, on March 23, 2019 in Christchurch, New Zealand. 50 people were killed, and dozens were injured in Christchurch on Friday, March 15 when a gunman opened fire at the Al Noor and Linwood mosques. The attack is the worst mass shooting in New Zealand's history.  (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images)
CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND - MARCH 23: Al Noor mosque is pictured after being officially reopened following last weeks attack, on March 23, 2019 in Christchurch, New Zealand. 50 people were killed, and dozens were inj... CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND - MARCH 23: Al Noor mosque is pictured after being officially reopened following last weeks attack, on March 23, 2019 in Christchurch, New Zealand. 50 people were killed, and dozens were injured in Christchurch on Friday, March 15 when a gunman opened fire at the Al Noor and Linwood mosques. The attack is the worst mass shooting in New Zealand's history. (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images) MORE LESS
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April 29, 2019 3:51 p.m.

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A terror plot by an Army veteran who converted to Islam and planned to bomb a white supremacist rally in Southern California as retribution for the New Zealand mosque attacks was thwarted, federal prosecutors said Monday.

Mark Domingo, 26, an infantryman who served a combat stint in Afghanistan, was arrested by federal agents Friday while finalizing plans to plant a bomb at a Nazi rally that had been scheduled Sunday in Long Beach.

Domingo was arrested on a charge of providing material support to terrorists and a criminal complaint said he had been planning since March to “manufacture and use a weapon of mass destruction in order to commit mass murder.”

Court papers show that Domingo discussed with an informant different types of attacks that included targeting Jews, churches and police officers.

Domingo allegedly said he wanted revenge for attacks on mosques in New Zealand that killed 50 people last month.

Domingo allegedly bought parts, including nails, for an improvised explosive device that would be remotely triggered, but in fact contained inert materials, FBI agent Tasha Coolidge said in an affidavit filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.

If they survived the planned bombing at Bluff Park, Domingo discussed launching further attacks on the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles or on a train.

White nationalists never showed up to the planned event in Bluff Park, but a large group of counter protesters demonstrated.

A message left on a phone listed for Domingo was not immediately returned.

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