Dallas Police Fires White Cop Accused Of Fatally Shooting Her Black Neighbor

RICHARDSON, TX - SEPTEMBER 13: A person carrying a wreath of flowers walks through the parking lot at the Greenville Avenue Church of Christ for the funeral service for Botham Shem Jean on September 13, 2018 in Richardson, Texas. Jean was killed when a Dallas Police officer who accidentally went into Jean's apartment, thinking it was her own and shot him. (Photo by Stewart  F. House/Getty Images)
RICHARDSON, TX - SEPTEMBER 13: A person carrying a wreath of flowers walks through the parking lot at the Greenville Avenue Church of Christ for the funeral service for Botham Shem Jean on September 13, 2018 in Richa... RICHARDSON, TX - SEPTEMBER 13: A person carrying a wreath of flowers walks through the parking lot at the Greenville Avenue Church of Christ for the funeral service for Botham Shem Jean on September 13, 2018 in Richardson, Texas. Jean was killed when a Dallas Police officer who accidentally went into Jean's apartment, thinking it was her own and shot him. (Photo by Stewart F. House/Getty Images) MORE LESS
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September 24, 2018 12:26 p.m.

DALLAS (AP) — A white police officer accused of fatally shooting her black neighbor inside his own apartment has been dismissed, the police department announced Monday.

The Dallas Police Department fired Officer Amber Guyger on Monday, weeks after she fatally shot 26-year-old Botham Jean inside his own apartment on Sept. 6. Court records show Guyger said she thought she had encountered a burglar inside her own home.

Guyger was arrested on a preliminary charge of manslaughter days after the shooting. She is out on bond.

Jean family attorneys and protesters have called for her firing following the shooting.

Guyger was a four-year veteran of the police force. She told investigators that she had just ended a shift when she returned in uniform to the South Side Flats apartment complex.

When she put her key in the apartment door, which was unlocked and slightly ajar, it opened, the affidavit said. Inside, the lights were off, and she saw a figure in the darkness that cast a large silhouette across the room, according to the officer’s account.

She called 911. When asked where she was, she returned to the front door to see she was in the wrong unit, according to the affidavit. The 911 tapes have not been released.

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