McCarthy Accuses Nadler Of Trying To Make Barr ‘Break The Law’ With Subpoena

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May 12, 2019 2:01 p.m.

Adopting a line from the Trump administration, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) on Sunday accused Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY) of asking Attorney General Bill Barr to “break the law” with his Mueller report subpoena.

“Chairman Nadler just held the attorney general in contempt because he requested that he break the law,” McCarthy said during his “Face the Nation” interview with Margaret Brennan.

McCarthy said that if the House Judiciary chairman was “that serious about getting to the bottom,” then he’d read the redact Mueller report in full.

“But he hasn’t even gone to read it while trying to hold the attorney general in contempt,” McCarthy complained. “He’s asking him to break the law.”

The Trump administration made that same argument after Barr ignored the House Judiciary Committee’s subpoena for special counsel Robert Mueller’s unredacted report and his grand jury materials. Democrats pointed out that judges have the power to approve disclosure of redacted material, and that they’re simply asking Barr to help them make that request to the courts.

After Barr refused to budge, the committee voted in favor of holding the attorney general in contempt.

On Friday, Nadler sent a letter to Barr offering to start negotiations over the subpoena again.

Watch below:

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